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Tick Attack Q&A

 

  • Directions about where to spray, how much and which areas to concentrate on/avoid.

Tick Attack is an aqueous spray concentrate that must be diluted before use. Mixing Method: Mix 70 (seventy) ml of Tick Attack™ (concentrate) with 930 (nine hundred and thirty) ml of water in your desired sprayer/applicator to obtain 1 litre of  ready-to-use formula. OR to dilute one litre bottle of Tick Attack™ (concentrate), mix well with 13.3 litres of water.  When properly diluted, 1 litre of Tick Attack™ concentrate will treat approximately 1 acre (or 0.4 ha). 

Thoroughly mix solution and spray all plant surfaces (including underside of leaves) until completely wet. Frequently shake/mix solution as you spray. 

Spray foliage or surface (deck, wall, fence etc.) until run-off. 

For best use apply in early morning or late evening; avoid spraying midday, under direct sunlight; avoid applying in windy conditions.  

No danger to plants is expected if label directions are followed, but test on a small area if in doubt about the sensitivity of a particular plant. 

Use caution when applying near or on pteridophyta (i.e. ferns, horsetails, mosses and other non-flowering, spore bearing/reproducing plants) and dicotyledons (i.e. roses, hollyhock, oak, carrot, and other plants with paired embryonic leaves) as phototoxicity (discoloration, minor leaf damage) may occur.

 

  • How often should I reapply? How many times in a season would we apply the product (i.e. After every rain? Seasonally; spring, summer and fall?)

Tick Attack will kill up to 80% of ticks in the first 48 hours, and will continue to kill over 92% of ticks within two weeks of treatment. It will also repel up to 100% of ticks while present. It would be most useful to apply at the beginning of a dry period to allow for the greatest effectiveness and length of use of the product.

If ticks are already present, it may be beneficial to repeat the treatment of Tick Attack after a week.  

Re-apply after heavy rain (between 10-50 mm per hour) or if ticks and mites continue to be a problem.  

If you live nearby wooded and/or country areas with wildlife populations (i.e., deer, rodents, birds), check the potential presence of ticks brought in by wildlife. If this is a common occurrence, reapplication of the product is recommended.

Spraying for nymph ticks should start in late spring or early summer, or anytime temperatures are consistently near or above 4°C. 

Application in late fall (before temperatures drop below 4°C) will kill overwintering ticks, reducing populations for the following spring. 

 

  • Do you use an emulsifier and if so, which one? Will I have to shake the product as I use it?  

We use Polysorbate 80 (a naturally derived, food-grade emulsifier) to aid in the consistency of the product, however, as it is a concentrate that must be diluted prior to use we suggest you continue to shake the solution as you apply for utmost uniformity.

 

  • Is it ok to apply if the ground is wet?

Yes, however, it is best to check the forecast and apply when there is no significant rain expected for at least two or three days. 

Areas treated with Tick Attack will typically be ready for use an hour after application, however this ‘drying time’ may be slightly delayed depending on how wet the ground is to which it’s been applied. 

It is also best to apply Tick Attack when there is no direct sun (sunrise, sunset), to keep from causing magnified light exposure on plant surfaces.

 

  • Do I need to disturb the ground to make sure the spray finds the ticks who may be hiding under leaf litter?

No, no need. Disturbing the ground may cause ticks to hide, and in this case you’d prefer to have them hanging on the open vegetation to be easily reached by the product. Ticks are usually active and questing near and above 4°C. 

 

  • Will this kill the tick eggs as well?

Absolutely. It will also kill spider mites and mosquito larvae, though this is not the label-identified use.

 

  • What is the ideal time of no rain?

Tick Attack will kill up to 80% of ticks in the first 48 hours, and will continue to kill over 92% of ticks within two weeks of treatment. It will also repel up to 100% of ticks while present. It would be most useful to apply at the beginning of a dry period to allow for the greatest effectiveness and length of use of the product.

Product should be reapplied in the case of heavy rain falls (between 10-50 mm per hour).   

 

  • Will the spray interfere with pollination when blossoms are open? 

Though application of Tick Attack (used in accordance with the label) does not pose any threat to the health of pollinators, it is recommended to apply the product at sunrise and sunset when pollinators are not active. 

The product is recommended to be applied where ticks are most commonly found, on grasses and non-fruiting shrubbery (lawn). As such, it is not recommended for direct use on flowers, pteridophyta (i.e. ferns, horsetails, mosses and other non-flowering, spore bearing/reproducing plants) and dicotyledons (i.e. roses, hollyhock, oak, carrot, and other plants with paired embryonic leaves) as phototoxicity (discoloration, minor leaf damage) may occur.

 

  • Do you have any data available for the consumer on toxicity to the plants and pollinating insects?

Tick Attack, with an active ingredient concentration of 5% garlic oil, does not present any concern to the health of pollinators. Please feel free to reference the materials below to further your understanding.


REFERENCES

Impact of Botanical Insecticides on Indigenous Stingless Bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae), Vânia Maria Xavier et al., Sociobiology Vol. 56, No. 3, (2010)

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Marcelo-Picanco/publication/280239156_Impact_of_Botanical_Insecticides_on_Indigenous_Stingless_Bees_Hymenoptera_Apidae/links/55aee32808aed9b7dcdda8a9/Impact-of-Botanical-Insecticides-on-Indigenous-Stingless-Bees-Hymenoptera-Apidae.pdf

Control of Varroa destructor (Acari : Varroidae) in Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera : Apidae) by using Plant Oils and Extract, Rashid Mahmood et al., Pakistan J. Zool., vol. 46(3), pp. 609-615 (2014).

http://zsp.com.pk/pdf46/609-615%20_3_%20PJZ-1299-13%2016-4-14%20FINAL.%20CONTROL%20OF%20VARROA%20DESTRUCTOR%20USING%20plant%20oilext_.pdf

Efficacy of essential oils against Varroa destructor infesting Apis mellifera Linn. colonies and their impact on brood development Vimla Goswami et al., Journal of Applied and Natural Science 6 (1): 27-30 (2014)

 

  • Do you have any chemists and biologists on your team? 

Our scientific team is led by experts in the fields of biochemistry, insect neurophysiology, bio-pesticides and natural pest management, from Acadia University in Wolfville, NS. 

Kirk Hillier, Ph.D. Professor of Biology | Director, INSECTA (Insect NeuroScience and Ecology CenTre at Acadia) | Director, Acadia AgriTech Laboratory, 

Biology Department, Acadia University

Nicoletta Faraone, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry | Adjunct Professor of Biology, Chemistry Department, Acadia University


Tick Attack and Pets

Green spaces treated with Tick Attack are safe for use by people and pets. 


As per application instructions, Atlantick recommends a one hour delayed re-entry period after an area is treated with Tick Attack. After this hour has passed the formula will have dried onto the grasses and plants to which it’s been applied, and the area is safe for use by people and pets who do not have a garlic allergy or known sensitivity. 


The active ingredient in Tick Attack is 5% garlic oil, when properly diluted. While it is completely natural, this ingredient should not be used by people or pets with known garlic allergies, and should be used with caution around pets with known bleeding disorders. 


Ingestion is the main route of all pet poisonings, and dogs make up the grand majority of those affected - cats tend to be more discriminating and are three times less likely to become poisoned than dogs. 


Although garlic can be problematic when ingested in large quantities by cats and dogs, garlic is a Health Canada approved Veterinary Health Product, when applied at non-toxic dosages and frequencies


If you have any concerns about your cat or dog excessively eating grasses, monitor their activity in Tick Attack treated areas, and deter them from eating treated grasses.

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